adorablespiders:

little jumping spider hitching a ride on a beetle

image source 

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 500D
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/250th
  4. Focal Length: 105mm
allcreatures:

Picture: STEVEN PASSLOW/CATERS NEWS (via Pictures of the day: 27 March 2012 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Picture: STEVEN PASSLOW/CATERS NEWS (via Pictures of the day: 27 March 2012 - Telegraph)

clusterpod:

Masked Devil, Cyclochila australasiae.
The ventral (underneath) view shows this cicadas amazing rostrum (its proboscis, mouthparts) which it uses to penetrate plant material to feed on its xylem.
The Masked Devil is thought to have a life cycle of seven years or more, most of that as a larvae underground, feeding on sap from tree roots. Large cicadas like the Masked Devil may survive as an adult for several months.
This individual (exhausted) photographed at the Heritage Rail Trestle Bridge, Mount Lawson state park, Victoria.
clusterpod:

Masked Devil, Cyclochila australasiae.
The ventral (underneath) view shows this cicadas amazing rostrum (its proboscis, mouthparts) which it uses to penetrate plant material to feed on its xylem.
The Masked Devil is thought to have a life cycle of seven years or more, most of that as a larvae underground, feeding on sap from tree roots. Large cicadas like the Masked Devil may survive as an adult for several months.
This individual (exhausted) photographed at the Heritage Rail Trestle Bridge, Mount Lawson state park, Victoria.
clusterpod:

Masked Devil, Cyclochila australasiae.
The ventral (underneath) view shows this cicadas amazing rostrum (its proboscis, mouthparts) which it uses to penetrate plant material to feed on its xylem.
The Masked Devil is thought to have a life cycle of seven years or more, most of that as a larvae underground, feeding on sap from tree roots. Large cicadas like the Masked Devil may survive as an adult for several months.
This individual (exhausted) photographed at the Heritage Rail Trestle Bridge, Mount Lawson state park, Victoria.

clusterpod:

Masked Devil, Cyclochila australasiae.

The ventral (underneath) view shows this cicadas amazing rostrum (its proboscis, mouthparts) which it uses to penetrate plant material to feed on its xylem.

The Masked Devil is thought to have a life cycle of seven years or more, most of that as a larvae underground, feeding on sap from tree roots. Large cicadas like the Masked Devil may survive as an adult for several months.

This individual (exhausted) photographed at the Heritage Rail Trestle Bridge, Mount Lawson state park, Victoria.

rhamphotheca:

Trilobite Beetles Are Happy Being On Land, Alive in the Present Day
by Bec Crew
I know they look like they belong in the ocean 250 million years ago, but trilobite beetles are actually pretty happy existing in the present day. On land. They hate water, what are you doing? Don’t put them in there. You’ll kill them if you do that. Found in lowland forests across Southeast Asia and India, these peculiar beetles are an enigma wrapped in an armoured shell with the tiniest head and some nice orange highlights.
The trilobite genus Duliticola belongs to the family Lycidae, commonly known as net-winged beetles. This family is a pretty interesting one, because many of its species display huge physical differences between their males and their females. Trilobite beetles are no exception.
While the females are easily recognisable – that incredible form is retained from when they were larvae – the males look entirely different. They pretty much just look like plain old beetles, with long, winged bodies and a pair of thick antennae. And all they have to look forward to is growing to 5 mm long. How embarrassing, because the females end up more than ten times larger, growing up to 6 cm long…
(read more: Running Ponies - Scientific American)
photos: T - female Duliticola paradoxa by Bernard Dupont; M - female D. hoiseni by A. F. S. L. Lok and H. H. Tan; B - female D. paradoxa by Lok and Tan rhamphotheca:

Trilobite Beetles Are Happy Being On Land, Alive in the Present Day
by Bec Crew
I know they look like they belong in the ocean 250 million years ago, but trilobite beetles are actually pretty happy existing in the present day. On land. They hate water, what are you doing? Don’t put them in there. You’ll kill them if you do that. Found in lowland forests across Southeast Asia and India, these peculiar beetles are an enigma wrapped in an armoured shell with the tiniest head and some nice orange highlights.
The trilobite genus Duliticola belongs to the family Lycidae, commonly known as net-winged beetles. This family is a pretty interesting one, because many of its species display huge physical differences between their males and their females. Trilobite beetles are no exception.
While the females are easily recognisable – that incredible form is retained from when they were larvae – the males look entirely different. They pretty much just look like plain old beetles, with long, winged bodies and a pair of thick antennae. And all they have to look forward to is growing to 5 mm long. How embarrassing, because the females end up more than ten times larger, growing up to 6 cm long…
(read more: Running Ponies - Scientific American)
photos: T - female Duliticola paradoxa by Bernard Dupont; M - female D. hoiseni by A. F. S. L. Lok and H. H. Tan; B - female D. paradoxa by Lok and Tan rhamphotheca:

Trilobite Beetles Are Happy Being On Land, Alive in the Present Day
by Bec Crew
I know they look like they belong in the ocean 250 million years ago, but trilobite beetles are actually pretty happy existing in the present day. On land. They hate water, what are you doing? Don’t put them in there. You’ll kill them if you do that. Found in lowland forests across Southeast Asia and India, these peculiar beetles are an enigma wrapped in an armoured shell with the tiniest head and some nice orange highlights.
The trilobite genus Duliticola belongs to the family Lycidae, commonly known as net-winged beetles. This family is a pretty interesting one, because many of its species display huge physical differences between their males and their females. Trilobite beetles are no exception.
While the females are easily recognisable – that incredible form is retained from when they were larvae – the males look entirely different. They pretty much just look like plain old beetles, with long, winged bodies and a pair of thick antennae. And all they have to look forward to is growing to 5 mm long. How embarrassing, because the females end up more than ten times larger, growing up to 6 cm long…
(read more: Running Ponies - Scientific American)
photos: T - female Duliticola paradoxa by Bernard Dupont; M - female D. hoiseni by A. F. S. L. Lok and H. H. Tan; B - female D. paradoxa by Lok and Tan

rhamphotheca:

Trilobite Beetles Are Happy Being On Land, Alive in the Present Day

by Bec Crew

I know they look like they belong in the ocean 250 million years ago, but trilobite beetles are actually pretty happy existing in the present day. On land. They hate water, what are you doing? Don’t put them in there. You’ll kill them if you do that. Found in lowland forests across Southeast Asia and India, these peculiar beetles are an enigma wrapped in an armoured shell with the tiniest head and some nice orange highlights.

The trilobite genus Duliticola belongs to the family Lycidae, commonly known as net-winged beetles. This family is a pretty interesting one, because many of its species display huge physical differences between their males and their females. Trilobite beetles are no exception.

While the females are easily recognisable – that incredible form is retained from when they were larvae – the males look entirely different. They pretty much just look like plain old beetles, with long, winged bodies and a pair of thick antennae. And all they have to look forward to is growing to 5 mm long. How embarrassing, because the females end up more than ten times larger, growing up to 6 cm long…

(read more: Running Ponies - Scientific American)

photos: T - female Duliticola paradoxa by Bernard Dupont; M - female D. hoiseni by A. F. S. L. Lok and H. H. Tan; B - female D. paradoxa by Lok and Tan

rhamphotheca:

Blue-Green Sharpshooter, Graphocephala atropunctata, Mount Lemmon, Santa Catalina Mountains, Pima County, Arizona, USA

(photo: Katja Schulz)

somersault1824:

The family Fulgoridae is a large group of hemipteran insects, especially abundant and diverse in the tropics, containing over 125 genera worldwide. Various genera and species (especially the genera Fulgora and Pyrops) are sometimes referred to as lanternflies or lanthorn flies, though they do not emit light.

via Science Frenzy

#naturephotography http://ift.tt/1hqLXdI

painted-bees:


Penh was eyeing up my lollipop something fierce. 
Expecting her to be repelled by it, I let her check it out.She wiggled her antennae all over it before shoving her face right into it with the fervor of a five-year-old sugar addict. Sean managed to snap a shot of the moment! 
Apparently it’s not “bad” for her, but too much sugar can’t be very ‘good’ either! Though, I’m have a feeling that she would insist otherwise if she were capable of doing so.
nom nom nom
painted-bees:


Penh was eyeing up my lollipop something fierce. 
Expecting her to be repelled by it, I let her check it out.She wiggled her antennae all over it before shoving her face right into it with the fervor of a five-year-old sugar addict. Sean managed to snap a shot of the moment! 
Apparently it’s not “bad” for her, but too much sugar can’t be very ‘good’ either! Though, I’m have a feeling that she would insist otherwise if she were capable of doing so.
nom nom nom
painted-bees:


Penh was eyeing up my lollipop something fierce. 
Expecting her to be repelled by it, I let her check it out.She wiggled her antennae all over it before shoving her face right into it with the fervor of a five-year-old sugar addict. Sean managed to snap a shot of the moment! 
Apparently it’s not “bad” for her, but too much sugar can’t be very ‘good’ either! Though, I’m have a feeling that she would insist otherwise if she were capable of doing so.
nom nom nom

painted-bees:

Penh was eyeing up my lollipop something fierce. 


Expecting her to be repelled by it, I let her check it out.
She wiggled her antennae all over it before shoving her face right into it with the fervor of a five-year-old sugar addict. Sean managed to snap a shot of the moment! 

Apparently it’s not “bad” for her, but too much sugar can’t be very ‘good’ either! Though, I’m have a feeling that she would insist otherwise if she were capable of doing so.

nom nom nom

insectlove:

nycbugmanAgalliopsis sp.

  1. Camera: SONY SLT-A57
  2. Aperture: f/22
  3. Exposure: 1/160th
  4. Focal Length: 100mm
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug
owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.
(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug

owlygem:

hello-shelby:

swagtasticswaggiemcswaggyswag:

thenimbus:

poetica-et-papiliones:

abnest:

landofrhymeandreason:

The Rosy Maple Moth is the prettiest moth ever.

(I do not own the rights to these photos, I just wanted to share this beautiful moth with tumblr.)

if you call moths “ugly butterflies” i will shit on everything you own.

Look at this cute mother fricker

I bet it tastes like strawberry banana

THIS MOTH THIS ONE RIGHT HERE IS THE ONLY ACCEPTABLE MOTH

wait why do you care what it tastes like, why the fuck would I eat this incredible thing.

its anna as a bug

helloolunaa:

fyeahcutemoths:

Butssbuttsbuttsssss.

lookatthatfuzzybutt.

stardustedlashes:

sing me a song (by twomeows)

rhamphotheca:

Lantern Bug (Pyrops candelarius), Mondulkiri, Cambodia (photo: Richard Seaman)

(Source: earthly-fauna)

archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.
archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.
Head over to Weezbo to view even more.

archiemcphee:

Weezbo assembled a fantastic collection of macro photos taken by Indonesian photographer Nordin Seruyan (previously featured here) in his back garden in Borneo, Indonesia. His backyard appears to be a veritable wonderland of beautiful mantises, dragonflies, caterpillars, moths, grasshoppers, ladybugs and other insects.

Head over to Weezbo to view even more.

(Source: alrights)